I have a good understanding of the ultimate flaw in Matt Harvey's pitching mechanics that created his problems. However, until recently I didn't know what cue was likely causing his Timing problem.

Matt Harvey at the Power T Position

Matt Harvey's Power T

However, this spring I met a young ballplayer who seems to have been taught the same thing that Matt Harvey was taught.

He calls it the Power T.

I believe that, when they teach the Power T, coaches think they are teaching pitchers to do what Roy Halladay did. However, and as I discuss in How Roy Halladay (Actually) Threw the Ball, they are missing something important.

Power T

Notice how Matt Harvey's arms are extended and his fingers are on top of the ball. While pitching, Matt Harvey tries to hold this position for as long as possible.

Matt Harvey at the Power T Position

Matt Harvey's Power T

Matt Harvey at the Power T Position

Matt Harvey's Power T

As the pictures above show, Matt Harvey holds the Power T into foot plant.

As a result, his arm is late and out of position at Foot Plant, which is the definition of a Timing problem.

That increases the load on his arm, enabling him to throw harder but also placing too much stress on his elbow (and his shoulder).

I don't know exactly what Matt Harvey was taught and what cues were used to develop his arm action. However, I have worked with kids who have been taught something called the Power T that looks very much like what Matt Harvey does..

Matt Harvey

Matt Harvey

The Power T looks just like it sounds; at foot plant, or as close to foot plant as possible, the pitcher's arms should be horizontal and sticking out from their sides.

Matt Harvey

Matt Harvey

I'm not sure where this idea originated, but I believe it started with Tom House's Flex T position and drill.

I'm not sure if having the forearms flat is a key part of the Flex T position or not. At a minimum, the fact that the position of the forearms isn't explicitly laid out, and is often demoed with the forearms flat, is part of the problem.

Power T

Power T

At some point, someone discovered that ballplayers could throw harder if they keep their arms flat into foot plant instead of trying to get their throwing arm up and in the high-cocked position.

That of course is true, but it ignores the injury implications of deliberately creating a Timing problem and the issues that I discuss in my analysis of Matt Harvey's pitching mechanics.