Last year, when I was working with the hitters at HSSU, I was talking to a hitter who was very athletic but who didn't hit nearly as well as I thought he could.

I realized what the problem was when I showed him the picture below of Joe Mauer and he just stood there, looking at it as a stunned, confused look came across his face.

Joe Mauer

The reason this picture had such an impact on him was that his conception of the swing simply couldn't process what he was seeing; it went against pretty much everything he had been taught.

While I still use that picture with hitters, I recently came across a series of images of Joc Pederson that are even more important and powerful.

A good swing doesn't have to be a complicated swing.

These multiple views of Joc Pederson hitting the same home run make that point as clearly as any sequence I've ever seen.

And they provide some hints about how to hit the pitch that should be the easiest to hit but that increasing numbers of hitters can't get to, not matter how they try.

Joc Pederson 2017.10.28 Home Run

What am I seeing that I think is so important?

Joc Pederson 2017.10.28 Home Run

Look at Joc Pederson's front elbow. At what it's doing. What it's REALLY doing. And what the barrel is doing as a result.

Joc Pederson 2017.10.28 Home Run

Is it up or down?

Joc Pederson 2017.10.28 Home Run

How does what Joc Pederson is DOING compare to what you were taught and/or were TEACHING?

Joc Pederson 2017.10.28 Home Run

Look at Joc Pederson's back elbow. Not just into contact, but at contact.

Joc Pederson 2017.10.28 Home Run

Joc Pederson 2017.10.28 Home Run

Joc Pederson 2017.10.28 Home Run

I could build an hour-long hitting presentation around just these pics and, if you don't understand why, I suggest you take another, deeper look at them.

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What do I see in the Joc Pederson sequence that I think is some important?

Joe Mauer

The picture above of Joe Mauer is one of my favorites -- I know from experience that it can open a player's eyes -- because it shows how simple a good swing can be and is.

  1. Get a good pitch to hit.
  2. Just turn.

The picture below of Joc Pederson shows exactly the same thing, and has the advantage of being of a good, young, active player, not a player like Joe Mauer whose best days are probably behind him.

Joc Pederson

The picture above of Joc Pederson can be used to illustrate a number of Concepts, Positions, and Shapes...

My next favorite image from the Joc Pederson sequence is from a moment sooner on in his swing.

Joc Pederson

The reason I find this image so captivating is, because it was shot from a higher angle and from slightly farther up the third base line, you can see Joc Pederson's front elbow, which is UP and in a position of superb Alignment and not down like so many people teach.

Joc Pederson

This picture also makes it easy to see how Joc Pederson's Vertical V is morphing into the Power L at contact due to the action of his Top Hand.

Joc Pederson

Two shapes I referred to frequently with the HSSU hitters were the Triangle and the Triangular Pyramid. Because the bat has come out of lag, the picture below of Joc Pederson isn't a great example of the Triangular Pyramid, but it is a great example of a hitter holding the Triangle into contact and not extending too soon.

Joc Pederson

Joc Pederson

Regardless of whether you call it The Box (above) or The L (below) this picture is a great example of how little a hitter's hands do on a good swing.

Joc Pederson

If you combine The Box and the Vertical V, you get what I call the Power Position.

Joc Pederson